Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Nai Nang’s honey will “BEE” in the best hotels of Thailand!


 By Isabel Robinson, MAP Volunteer Intern


Four years ago the community of Nai Nang in Krabi province, Thailand, started producing honey partly made from the mangroves flowers surrounding the village, but the most challenging part was how to market it. Most of the income and jobs around Nai Nang village are based on palm oil, rubber and fishing. The people asked themselves, “How can we make an income besides farming and fishing?” That’s when the idea of honey bees came along as several community members had already set-out bee boxes which had been colonized by the wild bee, Apis cerana. This is not only good for the environment, but also a great source of income and excellent for mangrove pollination.
Mangroves are vital to this project, and MAP has provided technical support helping out with mangrove planting, drainage of the area allowing natural mangrove reproduction.  But most importantly, teaching and educating the community so they can take care of the mangrove and continue with the restoration and conservation of this ecosystem. The mangrove is as vital to community as the community to the mangrove. 

Part of MAP’s help has been providing packaging and marketing support, and things are looking good for Nai Nang! The effort of the people and MAP is showing good results, as a couple of weeks ago Nai Nang received a visit from Mr. Sean Panton, Director of Corporate Social Responsibility at Marriott Hotels Thailand. He is responsible for the development of internal and external community and environmental programs and initiatives. Sean brought two chefs from Marriott Hotels in Phuket to taste test the honey. They liked it very much for the original salty-sweet taste of it, and their business interest with the community looks promising as they hope to make an agreement to purchase all natural raw Nai Nang honey to supply their hotels here in Thailand, the honey will be in the welcome drinks in Marriott Phuket and during the breakfast buffet in all the other Marriott branches.



This is great news for MAP and the Nai Nang community! A friendly relationship between the hotel business and conservation is possible, and what better example than this!

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

MAP News Issue 404, Nov 26, 2016

MAP News

PREVIEW VERSION

The MAP News
404th Edition                               November 26, 2016

FEATURE STORY

Researchers will be funded to study 'globally unique' mangrove deaths
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AUSTRALIA - Environmental researchers will be funded to investigate climate change in the Northern Territory's Gulf region over the past century, following the death of thousands of hectares of mangroves last year. Experts called it a "globally unique" phenomenon when they found a 200-kilometre stretch of dead mangroves along the Gulf of Carpentaria in the NT, stretching to Karumba in North Queensland. "We've seen almost 1,000 kilometres of dieback, it's very patchy; there are some areas which have survived, others have got very high levels of mortality," said Lindsay Hutley, Professor of environmental science at the Charles Darwin University (CDU). The NT Government has announced a $200,000 research grant to CDU to urgently study the mangrove dieback, a condition in which the tree dies from the tip of its leaves or roots backwards, generally as a cause of environmental conditions or disease. "We need to understand the causality that's driven this quite remarkable event in northern Australia," Professor Hutley said. READ MORE

AFRICA

Nations come together to save Kenya’s disappearing coastal forests
Christopher-Omusula-the-Nursery-attendant-at-Amu-Ranch-attends-to-seedlings-awaiting-replanting-during-rainy-season
KENYA - Dense green foliage flanks the dusty, heavily potholed road in Witu Forest, a protected area on the Kenyan coast about 75 kilometers from the city of Lamu. Comprising native shrubs, grasses, and trees, the area has so far escaped the massive deforestation that has befallen much of northern Kenya’s coastal forests lining the country’s portion of the Horn of Africa. Nearby, patches of cleared and burned land await conversion to agricultural land and new settlements – a common theme in this part of East Africa. This area is part of a coastal forest belt near the Kenya-Somalia border is part of the Eastern Africa Coastal Forests ecoregion that stretches from southern Somalia through Kenya and Tanzania and most of Mozambique’s coast, ending at the Limpopo River. According to the Kenya Forest Service (KFS), the Kenyan portion covers an area of over 120,000 hectares, with mangroves comprising around 20,000 hectares. Considered one of Conservation International’s 35 “biodiversity hotspots,” the region is home to a wide variety of wildlife – many endemic, meaning they’re found nowhere else in the world. READ MORE

Govt in new bid to protect mangrove forests
Image
KENYA - The Kenya Forestry Research Institute (Kefri) is in the process of developing a master plan to protect mangrove forests in the country. This follows the massive loss of mangroves along Kenya's coastline that forced the government to ban the cutting of the trees. Kefri Board chairman Sammy Latema said the country has lost almost 18 per cent of its mangrove cover since 1985. Addressing journalists in Lamu shortly after paying a courtesy call on Governor Issa Timamy at the weekend, Mr Latema said it is unfortunate that a big number of mangroves are being lost every year in the country. "The rate at which mangroves are being cut is worrying. In fact, the rate of replacement does not match what we are losing. That’s why we are developing a plan to enable sustainable utilisation," said Mr Latema. READ MORE

Mangrove protection key to survival for Senegalese community
farmerscolle
SENEGAL - Pelicans, flamingos, monkeys and even hyenas are under threat in Senegal along with the livelihoods of the local people as thick clusters of mangroves are disappearing. And it seems that not even an ancestral spirit can save them. The protected marine area (AMP) of Joal in western Senegal, just to the north of the Gambia, is home to an incredibly rich biodiversity. The hardy mangrove shrubs thrive in salty water, thick mud and hot, humid conditions that would kill most other plants. Part of Senegal's peaceful Petite Cote, Joal's mangroves are being eroded by a combination of factors, including global warming, deforestation, public works, oyster and clam fishing, salination of the fresh water river and drought. All along the riverbed, great swathes of sandy dunes have appeared in place of the once suffocating canopy of mangroves. "The empty spaces are areas where the mangrove has disappeared," said Abdoulaye Sagna, a manager at the Joal AMP. READ MORE

Kwale community nets cash protecting mangroves
kwale_community_nets5821b3ad1ea7d
KENYA - Along Kenya’s coastline at Makongeni area in Kwale County lies some 615 hectares of thick Mangrove forest jealously guarded by the surrounding communities who a few years back harvested the plant for economic purposes. The plantation served as a raw material for building houses and boats to a community whose nearly 90 per cent of population depends on fishing. The change sweeping the area is necessitated by the importance of conserving mangroves to fight climate change and using the proceeds to improve people’s lives, which is now turning out to be of tangible benefits beyond the area. Through a partnership with Kenya Forest Service, Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute, and Plan Vivo which is a registered Scottish charity, they are making millions of shillings through protection and populating Coastline with more mangrove. A project started two years ago now earns the community between Sh1 million to Sh1.2 million per year depending on the performance of local currency. READ MORE

ASIA

Collaborating to enhance coastal resilience in Thailand
MMF
THAILAND - Through Mangroves for the Future (MFF), IUCN established a partnership with Marriott Hotels & Resorts to protect the environment and support Thailand’s local communities through mangrove restoration, the use of sustainable seafood sources and local procurement practices. At a recent mangrove plantation event with Marriott Hotels & Resorts Staff at Ka Long, Samut Sakhon, MFF interviewed the village chief Tipaya Saejiw on how this project has helped build the resilience of her community. MFF would like to thank Denise Ng, a multimedia journalist and oral history practitioner with an interest in sustainable development, for editing this video. Read more about MFF's collaboration with Marriott Hotels & Resorts here: WATCH VIDEO

Snails, bamboo, mangroves dominate Philippines climate pitch
typhoon-3
PHILIPPINES - Peppered with references to snails and bamboos, the Philippine environment secretary’s speech at the UN Climate Change talks on 16 Nov has raised concerns that it obscured the country’s call for more ambitious and urgent global climate action. Secretary Gina Lopez said at the high-level segment of the 22nd Conference of Parties (COP22) that failure to limit the global average temperature to 1.5C can lead to the destruction of the country’s “3,000 species of marine life,” one of which is snails. “This is not just the wealth of the Philippines – it is the wealth of all of us together,” she stressed, specifying endemic species such as a snail, whose “venom has been found by a Nobel laureate to be better than morphine in addressing pain without the side effects.” It’s an example that showcased the country’s marine biodiversity, but not all in the delegation are sure that it captured the gravity of the impacts of climate change on the Philippines, one of the countries most vulnerable to strong storms and drought. READ MORE

Apple mangroves make a comeback along Mumbai’s coast after a decade
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INDIA - Over the past five years, an uncommon mangrove species has started to dominate wetland and creek areas along the Mumbai coast – one that was barely visible a decade ago. Mangrove cell officials have recorded a threefold increase in the cover of apple mangroves (Sonneratia alba) at creek edges from 2% to 6% across Mumbai, Navi Mumbai and Thane since 2011. Environmentalists said the increase in the mangrove cover assumes significance since these trees play an important role in absorbing pollutants in water bodies. Wetlands across Mumbai and Thane have been witnessing large scale destruction due to encroachments, debris dumping and untreated sewage. Additionally, Thane city also harbours Asia’s largest industrial complex, effluents of which are released directly or indirectly into the creek, thereby increasing pollution and affecting growth of mangroves. A rapid biodiversity assessment report in 2015 revealed a 90% decline in the number of fishes at the Thane creek due to high levels of water pollution. READ MORE

AMERICAS

Fate of Colombian shellfish pickers closely tied to mangrove
DSC_0102edited
COLUMBIA - Along the northern edge of Colombia’s Pacific coast region, thousands of people rely on an unassuming shellfish called a “piangua” for daily survival. The small, black clam lives tucked deep in the stinky mud of mangrove trees. But the global decline of mangrove forests at about 1 percent annually, years-long decline of the piangua, encroaching drug traffickers, and the stigma surrounding piangua pickers are endangering the traditional practice of piangua picking. Though found along much of Colombia’s Pacific coast, the vast majority of piangua are found in the region of Sanquianga. The extraction of piangua, a clam that’s rich in nutrients and flavor, has long been a key economic activity in the region. It is found in coastal areas from Mexico to Peru, and acts as a natural filter that helps to preserve the oxygenation of the sediments that keep the mangrove alive. READ MORE

Everglades mangroves worth billions in fight against climate change
evergladesma
USA - When it comes to storing carbon, scientists have put a price tag on the value of mangroves in Everglades National Park and it's in the billions. Based on a scientific cost estimate, the stored carbon is worth between $2 billion and $3.4 billion, the researchers found. It is a relatively small price when considering the cost to society if the carbon currently stored in these mangroves were ever released into the atmosphere, according to the researchers at FIU who co-authored the study. "Although the Everglades National Park is a protected national treasure, the National Parks Service doesn't have much control over freshwater flowing into the park," said Mahadev Bhat, co-author of the study and professor in the Department of Earth and Environment. "If there isn't enough freshwater flowing through the Everglades, we may eventually lose some of the mangroves. And once you let stored carbon out, that same carbon can lead to increased global warming and cost society a lot more." READ MORE

OCEANA

Why you should care about Australia's mangroves
5612326-3x2-700x467
AUSTRALIA - The importance of trees is taught to us at a young age — they filter the air we breathe by converting carbon dioxide to oxygen. But how important are mangroves? Just like their land-locked relatives, mangroves filter the air, but their importance to the environment goes beyond that. "They're a tree obviously, so they're producing oxygen and people think of them as lungs, but you've got to think of them as kidneys as well," James Cook University (JCU) associate professor Jamie Seymour said. "Everything that comes in gets sucked up by these [mangroves] and they suck all the bad things out. Things like fertilizers and run-off, all those sorts of things, this is what mangroves are really good at. They're capable of sucking all that up. "As well as filtering the air and the oceans, mangroves provide shelter for a range of species. READ MORE


LAST WORD

What? No Last Word?

We welcome your letters and comments. Let us know about your projects and activities.
 

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Please cut and paste these news alerts/ action alerts on to your own lists and contacts. Help us spread the word and further generate letters of concern, as this can make a big difference in helping to halt a wrongdoing or encourage correct action.


ACTION ALERTS WANTED: MAP News is looking for links to calls to actions/petitions and letter writing campaigns on mangrove issues, tropical coastal communities and other related topics. Not all submissions can be selected, but we look forward to hearing about your work and want to let our readers' voice be heard!
Email submissions to news@mangroveactionproject.org

Action Alerts:

VOTE The Nagenahiru Project on Solar Power for Night Fishing in Sri Lanka is selected as a finalist by the Water, Air and Food Foundation in Denmak. VOTE HERE

MAP Calendar 2017
MAP is happy to announce that we are now accepting orders for our 2017 Children's Mangrove Art Calendar . This is our 16th annual edition of Children's Mangrove Art, and this Calendar is celebrating MAP's 25th Anniversary! Please order your calendars now, and help us celebrate a quarter century of MAP's work to Save the Mangroves!"

The world's largest mangrove forest is in danger from a massive coal plant.
UNESCO can put pressure on India and Bangladesh to protect the forest, but they need to see that people around the world are speaking out. Click here to add your voice.


Our new short documentary, Reducing the Risk of Disaster through Nature-Based Solutions : Mangroves
EPIC-Film 2

Tell Red Lobster its "Endless shrimp" deal is damaging and unfair to the workers SIGN THE PETITION
 
Mangroves: Guidebook to Malaysia – available for download here
 
Mangrove rehabilitation in Asia – Local Action and cross-border Transfer of Knowledge for the Conservation of Climate, Forests and Biodiversity VIEW VIDEOS HERE

Volunteer Opportunities with Mangrove Action Project CLICK HERE
 
STOP PLANTING MANGROVES ON SEAGRASS BEDS _ A CALL TO ACTION
Want to learn more about mangroves?mangrove-action-project-presentation-1-1024.jpg?cb=1424228039
Our short presentation will give you a better understanding of the issues we are working to solve. WATCH PRESENTATION
What is CBEMR? Easy to follow fact sheet – CLICK HERE

SHARE MAP'S VISION 
CLICK HERE to watch short introductory video. Together we can work "at the roots of the sea".
Join us in saving our beautiful country!
We hope you have been following the ongoing battle in Bimini, Bahamas.
We are in need of your help more than ever Click here
 
Exclusive Interview with Alfredo Quarto, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Mangrove Action Project - See more
Save the Sundarbans from Rampal power plant – View Sample Letter to Minister
Sign the Petition
 
Question Your Shrimp- Don't Buy or Sell Imported Tropical Shrimp! Sign the Petition

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum in Bangladesh - WATCH VIDEO
MARVELLOUS MANGROVES IN BRAZIL
En Portuges

MAP%20Curriculum%20Video
Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide.


FOR MORE ON MAPs AWARD WINNING CHINA MANGROVE CURRICULUM VISIT
Education in the Mangroves - China
VIMEO SHOW
VISIT OUR "MM" WEBPAGE

Check out our presentation for more details on Marvellous Mangroves

“Education In The Mangroves" can now be seen on the  PhotoPhilanthropy website here!

Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT
 
Article in Canada's Green Teacher Magazine - Read More

FREE MAP Mangrove e-cards CLICK HERE
Mangrove-Green-Turtle-Bimini-277x186
MAP’s e-Cards offer you a unique way to spread the word about MAP’s good works, while sharing beautiful photographs of the mangroves

Donate to MAP via Paypal
Giving could never be easier
Donate.jpg
It’s the action, not the fruit of the action, that's important. You have to do the right thing. It may not be in your power, may not be in your time, that there'll be any fruit. But that doesn't mean you stop doing the right thing. You may never know what results come from your action. But if you do nothing, there will be no result. —Mahatma Gandhi

Green Planet Fundraising Assists MAP – LEARN MORE

MANGROVE ISSUES 
View MAP’s uploaded Videos at MAPmangrover’sChannel

The importance of restoring mangroves in an effective, long-term manner. Mangrove CBEMR video - VIEW
Question Your Shrimp Consumer/Markets Campaign!  WATCH VIDEO

Mangrove Restoration in Asia – Watch Short Video

Mosaic of Life 
READ A MOSAIC OF LIFE Peek into the underwater world of mangroves, "womb of the sea." By Liz Cunningham Photos By Wes Matweyew and Liz Cunningham
 

"Question Your Shrimp" Campaign

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog
Editor’s Note: Mangrove Action Project’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto was interviewed about shrimp by Green Acre Radio’s Martha Baskin
LISTEN TO INTERVIEW

Information sheds clear light on shrimp-mangrove connection
Question Your Shrimp
SEE DETAILS MANGROVE/SHRIMP

Join MAP on Facebook

Sign the Consumer's Pledge to avoid imported shrimp

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Note to Our Readers:
We strive to keep active links in our newsletter. However, due to circumstances beyond our control,
occasionally links to stories may become broken. If you find a link to a story is not functioning, please cut and paste the headline into your browser search bar. In most cases you should be able to locate the original story.



Help Mangrove Action Project through your recycled E-Waste.  List of Accepted E-waste Items:
Injet Cartidges, Cell Phones, Pagers, GPS, Radar Detectors, Mobile Hot Spots, Calculators, eBook Readers, iPods/MP3 players, Digital/Video Cameras/Camcorders, PDAs, iPads/Tablets/Laptops, Video Game Consoles, Handheld Video Games
Visit the Mangrove Action Project recycle website Click on the recycle button then click on the Download Shipping Label, and follow the instructions.

 
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Thursday, November 10, 2016

MAP NEWS Issue 403, Nov 12, 2016

VerticalResponse

The MAP News
403rd Edition                               November 12, 2016

FEATURE STORY

MAP's EPIC film receives another award
EPIC-Film 2
CHINA - "Reducing the Risk of Disaster through Nature-Based Solutions: Mangroves" has received the Nominee's Award by the China Science Film and Video Association. This makes a total of 10 countries where it has or will be shown. The Honorary credential awarded jointly by the China Scientific Film and Video Association and the Shenzhen Association for Science and Technology named Mangrove Action Project’s entry as “Nominees Prize” in the 2016 China Dragon Awards. Besides being displayed at the IUCN HQ in Switzerland, it has been or will be shown at film festivals or conference in Australia, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Hawaii, Malaysia, and Thailand. The EPIC video has had over 1,600 views on the MAP YouTube site and the recent Thai version about 250 views. READ MORE

AFRICA

African Wetlands Project: A Win For the Climate and the People?
SalySarr3_450
SENEGAL - In Senegal and other developing countries, multinational companies are investing in programs to restore mangrove forests and other wetlands that sequester carbon. But critics say these initiatives should not focus on global climate goals at the expense of the local people’s livelihoods. Standing calf-deep in the warm, brackish water of Senegal’s Saloum Delta, Saly Sarr points to a mass of ripples colored silver by the setting sun. “You see that movement?” she says. “The fish are coming out.” All around her, the spindly trunks of young mangrove trees poke through the water. Seven years ago, this area on the edge of the island of Niodior was a sandy wasteland ravaged by drought. Today, thanks to reforestation work done by Sarr and other women, it is covered in mangroves that shelter young fish from the midday sun and hold the soil in place as the tides wash in and out. READ MORE

Nations come together to save Kenya’s disappearing coastal forests
KENYA - Dense green foliage flanks the dusty, heavily potholed road in Witu Forest, a protected area on the Kenyan coast about 75 kilometers from the city of Lamu. Comprising native shrubs, grasses, and trees, the area has so far escaped the massive deforestation that has befallen much of northern Kenya’s coastal forests lining the country’s portion of the Horn of Africa. Nearby, patches of cleared and burned land await conversion to agricultural land and new settlements – a common theme in this part of East Africa. This area is part of a coastal forest belt near the Kenya-Somalia border is part of the Eastern Africa Coastal Forests ecoregion that stretches from southern Somalia through Kenya and Tanzania and most of Mozambique’s coast, ending at the Limpopo River. According to the Kenya Forest Service (KFS), the Kenyan portion covers an area of over 120,000 hectares, with mangroves comprising around 20,000 hectares. Considered one of Conservation International’s 35 “biodiversity hotspots,” the region is home to a wide variety of wildlife – many endemic, meaning they’re found nowhere else in the world. READ MORE

ASIA

Alternative Approach for the Conservation and Farming of the Endangered Sea Cucumber
18732-BPlacing%20net%20around%20pond%20in%20mangrove
THAILAND - Holothuria scabra (sandfish) is an edible sea cucumber inhabiting tropical Indo-Pacific seagrass meadows. It is now endangered (IUCN Redlist) because of overharvesting. This project tests a sustainable alternative to current harvesting and culturing practices. On Phra Thong Island, local communities have established protected areas in seagrass meadows where the harvesting of all animals is prohibited. We observed large adult Holothuria scabra in one such area, but they were few in number. Juveniles occurred outside protection and were sometimes abundant but small in size and so of little commercial value. It was proposed that those juveniles be harvested and reared to a commercial size while adult populations, which are easily over-exploited, remain protected.Previous attempts to raise sea cucumbers in pens have not been successful locally. However in a recent trial, juveniles were stocked into an abandoned fish pond where they grew to a marketable size at a rate of 1.2 g/day over 11 months without the addition of food. READ MORE

Keep It Green: Mangroves – a vital eco-system component
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THAILAND - Coral reefs attract far more publicity than mangrove swamps. After all, coral is spectacularly beautiful, and affords protection to some of the world’s most spectacular fishes – clown fish, parrot fish, wrasse and literally hundreds of other species. From the air, mangrove swamps also look appealing, but close up are muddy and turbid with unsightly roots and often have a rank smell. Forget the aesthetics though. They are even more crucial to our marine environment than coral. Consider this. Shrimps are big business in Thailand: the country is the third largest exporter of seafood. Since the 1970s, the Thai government has promoted intensive shrimp production, especially in coastal areas. When descending to Phuket Airport, one passes over many shrimp farms. These rectangular ponds created in part by obliterating the stands of mangroves that once fringed the island’s eastern shoreline. READ MORE

50 more guns to protect mangroves and wildlife
THAILAND - The Sabah Forestry Department enforcement team is armed due to the constant risks they are facing while carrying out their duties, said its director Datuk Sam Mannan. He said that among the threats faced by his personnel came from the Philippines. He said the mangroves on the northern side of Sabah were often raided for the Tangal bark. “The Tangal bark is of no use in Malaysia but valuable in the Philippines. We have a lot of people who raid our mangrove on the northern side of Sabah,” he said during the launch of the second Sabah Ramsar Conference 2016 yesterday. Sam said these people were armed and had nothing to lose because if they went back empty handed, their own lives would be in peril. READ MORE

AMERICA

Editor’s Note - MAP’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto will be speaking at Biodiversity for a Livable Climate’s Oceans 2016 Conference.
Restoring Oceans, Restoring Climate Friday-Sunday, November 18-20, 2016
Puffer_Fish_DSC01257-768x582

USA - In our past six conferences we introduced many positive and powerful climate solutions for varied lands across the world, and brought hope to the difficult global warming story we are living through. Now we’re tackling a new and challenging player: Oceans. Are oceans little more than huge heat and acid sinks, poised for massive upheaval? Or are there powerful positive contributions that oceans can make to reverse global warming? We will explore both the physical power and fragility of the oceans, the mystery and revelations about life on earth that the waters hold, and some of the remarkable regenerative solutions available to help address the climate crisis. READ MORE

Ghost Forests: How Rising Seas Are Killing Southern U.S. Woodlands
DSC_0249_KB2800
USA - A steady increase in sea levels is pushing saltwater into U.S. wetlands, killing trees from Florida to as far north as New Jersey. But with sea level projected to rise by as much as six feet this century, the destruction of coastal forests is expected to become a worsening problem worldwide. On a recent afternoon, University of Florida watershed ecologist David Kaplan and Ph.D. candidate Katie Glodzik hiked through the Withlacoochee Gulf Preserve, on the Big Bend coast of northwestern Florida. Not long ago, red cedar, live oaks, and cabbage palms grew in profusion on the raised “hammock island” forests set amid the preserve’s wetlands. But as the researchers walked through thigh-high marsh grass, the barren trunks of dead cedars were silhouetted against passing clouds. Dead snag cabbage palms stood like toothpicks snapped at the top. Other trees and shrubs, such as wax myrtle, had long been replaced by more salt-tolerant black needlerush marsh grass. Saltwater, flowing into this swampy, freshwater-dependent ecosystem as a result of rising sea levels, is turning these stands of hardwoods into “ghost forests” of dead and dying trees. READ MORE

EUROPE

Shrimp imports being injected with dangerous chemicals - just to add weight
Grilled-Shrimp
UK - It seems that the more advanced human civilization becomes, the less we learn about what is and isn't good for our bodies. That's the only way to explain why many commercial food operations are so toxic and hazardous to our health. The UK's Daily Mail is reporting on a commercial shrimp operation in Vietnam where workers have been videotaped injecting them with disgusting gel-like substances in order to make them appear bigger and fresher before they are sold and exported. The video shows factory workers injecting tiger prawns (shrimp) in the head, tail and midsection with a gel substance to make them heavier before they are sold. Vietnam is the largest source of imported shrimp for many countries. The video footage was shot by a Vietnamese television station earlier this year. Since surfacing, it has gone viral online on social media sites like Facebook, with many people expressing disgust and outrage. READ MORE

WORLDWIDE

World on track to lose two-thirds of wild animals by 2020
6035.jpg?w=620&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=c3c80631e0dc2b6f71af282362351f9c
GLOBAL - The number of wild animals living on Earth is set to fall by two-thirds by 2020, according to a new report, part of a mass extinction that is destroying the natural world upon which humanity depends. The analysis, the most comprehensive to date, indicates that animal populations plummeted by 58% between 1970 and 2012, with losses on track to reach 67% by 2020. Researchers from WWF and the Zoological Society of London compiled the report from scientific data and found that the destruction of wild habitats, hunting and pollution were to blame. The collapse of wildlife is, with climate change, the most striking sign of the Anthropocene, a proposed new geological era in which humans dominate the planet. READ MORE

LAST WORD

Dear Alfredo,

Hope you are doing well.

Thanks for your kind continued cooperation.

Hope you aware about our ongoing Project on livelihood improvement for honey collectors through coast watershed conservation around the Sundarbans in Bangladesh which is supported by grant assistance for grassroots projects of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan and partnership with Japan Environmental Education Forum (JEEF).

Under the project we developed few of Sundarbans Mangrove Biodiversity conservation materials for Honey collectors, students-teachers and communities.
Activity Sheet 1 2
So we are excited to share Sundarbans Bee conservation materials with you.

If you are interested more about our project please always feel free to ask us. We are always happy to cooperate you.

Take care,

Best wishes,

Maksud
Md. Maksudur Rahman
Chief Executive
Bangladesh Environment and
Development Society (BEDS)
House No. 03, Road No 20
Nirala R/A, Khulna- 9100, Bangladesh
Tel: + 88 041 721123
Mob: + 88-01712 868004
email: <info@bedsbd.org> <bedsbd@gmail.com>
Facebook: www.facebook.com/bedsbd.org
Skype name: beds20111
Webpage: www.bedsbd.org 
 

BACK TO TOP

Not yet a subscriber?

Click here to subscribe.

Please cut and paste these news alerts/ action alerts on to your own lists and contacts. Help us spread the word and further generate letters of concern, as this can make a big difference in helping to halt a wrongdoing or encourage correct action.


ACTION ALERTS WANTED: MAP News is looking for links to calls to actions/petitions and letter writing campaigns on mangrove issues, tropical coastal communities and other related topics. Not all submissions can be selected, but we look forward to hearing about your work and want to let our readers' voice be heard!
Email submissions to news@mangroveactionproject.org

Action Alerts:

VOTE The Nagenahiru Project on Solar Power for Night Fishing in Sri Lanka is selected as a finalist by the Water, Air and Food Foundation in Denmak. VOTE HERE

MAP Calendar 2017
MAP is happy to announce that we are now accepting orders for our 2017 Children's Mangrove Art Calendar . This is our 16th annual edition of Children's Mangrove Art, and this Calendar is celebrating MAP's 25th Anniversary! Please order your calendars now, and help us celebrate a quarter century of MAP's work to Save the Mangroves!"

The world's largest mangrove forest is in danger from a massive coal plant.
UNESCO can put pressure on India and Bangladesh to protect the forest, but they need to see that people around the world are speaking out. Click here to add your voice.


Our new short documentary, Reducing the Risk of Disaster through Nature-Based Solutions : Mangroves
EPIC-Film 2

Tell Red Lobster its "Endless shrimp" deal is damaging and unfair to the workers SIGN THE PETITION
 
Mangroves: Guidebook to Malaysia – available for download here
 
Mangrove rehabilitation in Asia – Local Action and cross-border Transfer of Knowledge for the Conservation of Climate, Forests and Biodiversity VIEW VIDEOS HERE

Volunteer Opportunities with Mangrove Action Project CLICK HERE
 
STOP PLANTING MANGROVES ON SEAGRASS BEDS _ A CALL TO ACTION
Want to learn more about mangroves?mangrove-action-project-presentation-1-1024.jpg?cb=1424228039
Our short presentation will give you a better understanding of the issues we are working to solve. WATCH PRESENTATION
What is CBEMR? Easy to follow fact sheet – CLICK HERE

SHARE MAP'S VISION 
CLICK HERE to watch short introductory video. Together we can work "at the roots of the sea".
Join us in saving our beautiful country!
We hope you have been following the ongoing battle in Bimini, Bahamas.
We are in need of your help more than ever Click here
 
Exclusive Interview with Alfredo Quarto, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Mangrove Action Project - See more
Save the Sundarbans from Rampal power plant – View Sample Letter to Minister
Sign the Petition
 
Question Your Shrimp- Don't Buy or Sell Imported Tropical Shrimp! Sign the Petition

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum in Bangladesh - WATCH VIDEO
MARVELLOUS MANGROVES IN BRAZIL
En Portuges

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Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide.


FOR MORE ON MAPs AWARD WINNING CHINA MANGROVE CURRICULUM VISIT
Education in the Mangroves - China
VIMEO SHOW
VISIT OUR "MM" WEBPAGE

Check out our presentation for more details on Marvellous Mangroves

“Education In The Mangroves" can now be seen on the  PhotoPhilanthropy website here!

Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT
 
Article in Canada's Green Teacher Magazine - Read More

FREE MAP Mangrove e-cards CLICK HERE
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MAP’s e-Cards offer you a unique way to spread the word about MAP’s good works, while sharing beautiful photographs of the mangroves

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It’s the action, not the fruit of the action, that's important. You have to do the right thing. It may not be in your power, may not be in your time, that there'll be any fruit. But that doesn't mean you stop doing the right thing. You may never know what results come from your action. But if you do nothing, there will be no result. —Mahatma Gandhi

Green Planet Fundraising Assists MAP – LEARN MORE

MANGROVE ISSUES 
View MAP’s uploaded Videos at MAPmangrover’sChannel

The importance of restoring mangroves in an effective, long-term manner. Mangrove CBEMR video - VIEW
Question Your Shrimp Consumer/Markets Campaign!  WATCH VIDEO

Mangrove Restoration in Asia – Watch Short Video

Mosaic of Life 
READ A MOSAIC OF LIFE Peek into the underwater world of mangroves, "womb of the sea." By Liz Cunningham Photos By Wes Matweyew and Liz Cunningham
 

"Question Your Shrimp" Campaign

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog
Editor’s Note: Mangrove Action Project’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto was interviewed about shrimp by Green Acre Radio’s Martha Baskin
LISTEN TO INTERVIEW

Information sheds clear light on shrimp-mangrove connection
Question Your Shrimp
SEE DETAILS MANGROVE/SHRIMP

Join MAP on Facebook

Sign the Consumer's Pledge to avoid imported shrimp

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Thursday, October 27, 2016

MAP News Issue 402, October 29, 2016

VerticalResponse

The MAP News
402nd Edition                               October 29, 2016

FEATURE STORY

UNESCO calls for shelving Rampal project
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BANGLADESH – The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (Unesco) has recommended that Bangladesh shelve the Rampal coal-fired power plant, which is being constructed in close proximity to the Sundarbans. It said the project would cause irreparable damage to the forest and should be relocated. The three-member Unesco expert team which visited Bangladesh in March, made this appeal in their report submitted to the government. They said at the moment the Sundarbans would not be moved from the world heritage list to the endangered world heritage list, but requested for the Rampal project to be shelved and for Unesco’s recommendations to be followed. They said a decision in this regard would be taken at the 2017 World Heritage Commission meet. The Unesco report said the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) report found many discrepancies between the statements of Rampal project construction firm Bangladesh-India Friendship Power Company and the tender documents. During their Bangladesh visit, the team was only allowed to meet a limited number of experts. And the interaction with the local people was also organised by the company.
 
AFRICA
 
Benin launches Mangroves ecosystems restoration pilot
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BENIN – Benin’s government with the help of Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) recently launched a restoration of Mangroves Ecosystem and Forest protection pilot programme. The project began with an awareness seminar on the importance of mangroves in biodiversity balance. The programme aims to contribute to the welfare and food security of local populations. “We know that these resources are increasingly threatened by logging and degradation. They must therefore restore those ecosystem to also promote the maintenance of biodiversity and the production of goods and services, that these resources are used for, to provide for the population,” said Dr. Antoine Elie Padonou, FAO Consultant. The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) last year warned that 70% of the mangroves of Benin will disappear if nothing is done, with many implications including the destruction of fishing and spawning grounds. READ MORE
 
Ethiopia’s vulnerable tropical forests are key to securing future of wild coffee
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ETHIOPIA - Coffee is the drink of choice for millions of us. But the world’s second-most traded commodity originates in Ethiopia – and its home is under threat. Ethiopia isn’t all dusty deserts – far from it. The country also contains rugged highlands and lush, tropical forests. Coffea arabica grows here in its original, wild form. The forests of south-west Ethiopia are considered to be the birthplace of coffee and the centre of its genetic diversity. But these forests and this gene pool are under pressure. It is already one of the last major woodlands remaining in Ethiopia, and deforestation over the past 40 years has resulted in the loss of one-third of the south-west’s forest cover. We risk losing the forests entirely in coming decades. It is critical that these forests are protected. Commercially grown coffee has been bred over the years to ensure high yields and other useful characteristics. But it is descended from a small number of individual plants, and so relies on a relatively narrow genetic range – just 10% of the diversity found in the wild. This makes it vulnerable to pests – and climate change is an additional threat. Wild coffee on the other hand exhibits much greater genetic diversity, which increases its chances of adapting to new challenges and reduces the possibility of extinction. It represents an insurance policy for plantation coffee, in case commercial strains are ever badly damaged. READ MORE
 
Conserving mangrove forests in Senegal
SENEGAL - In Joal, a fishing town located in the south east- of the Senegal’s capital Dakar, the mangrove ecosystem is under threat. The UN estimates that Senegal has lost about 40% of its mangrove forests since the 1970s. With this in mind, there have been concerted efforts to preserve the remaining areas. “The mangrove is very important, in relation to fishing.There are a lot of animals like monkeys, hyenas which live in the mangrove,” said Abdou Karim-Sall, President, Management Committee of Marine Protected Area in Joal. Additionally, the reforestation of the mangroves has been ongoing at the Marine Protected Area in Joal. For communities that depend on the mangrove ecosystem for their livelihood, these efforts have borne fruit. The rehabilitation of the mangrove ecosystem and raising awareness on how to sustainably manage natural resources will go a long way in ensuring that the rich biodiversity is preserved for generations to come.READ MORE
 
Madagascar's Mangroves: The Ultimate Giving Trees
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MADAGASCAR - Locals already use the trees for food, fuel and building materials. Now they're burning them to make lime clay. Beyond Antananarivo—Madagascar’s capital city—signs of urbanization give way to sprawling farms and sweeping grasslands. At the coastal city of Toliara to the south, after a full day’s journey, the road turns into tire-sucking sandy track that mainly serves cattle-drawn wooden carts. For seven more hours, travelers cross a desert marked with spiny trees, where the sun bakes everything to a dusty crisp. Finally, the Bay of Assassins appears, an oasis thrumming with life, fringed with lush evergreen mangroves. A mangrove forest is unlike any other. At low tide, the trees loom from exposed mud, balancing on woody, tangled roots like ballerinas en pointe; at high tide, cool seawater erases the dry world, transforming the scene into an underwater spectacle. Glassy shrimp hover, their legs flickering with movement. Tiny metallic fry shimmer past, while adults lurk in the shadows. Slim tree roots stick up like pencils poked into the forest floor. Hermit crabs shuffle along thicker, oyster-encrusted roots that loop down through the water. READ MORE
 
ASIA
 
Mangrove online course by The Nature Conservancy and the UN University: “Mangroves Biodiversity and Ecosystem”
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THAILAND - Some months ago I decided to come to Thailand and do an internship in mangrove conservation, I’ve always been environment conscious and tried to be involve with projects and ideas that promote social change to help our planet. But this will be the first time I am actually doing something that has a bigger and more tangible result. I am from a city in the mountains, so I know more about habitats and ecosystems that exist 2000mts above sea level, or rainforests, due to the amazing and wide rainforest area in my country, Ecuador, than about mangroves. After applying to MAP, I decided that since I don’t have much experience or knowledge about mangroves I should start learning, and luckily I came across with a free online course. This new online course is recommended to anyone that wants to learn about mangroves, there are no requirements and it gives you a deeper understanding of this unique and critically important ecosystem, not just for tropical coastal communities by for all humans everywhere. READ MORE

 
China's reforestation program a letdown for wildlife, study finds
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CHINA – A team of international researchers led by Princeton University found that the overwhelming majority of forests restored under China’s Grain-for-Green program – which amount to roughly 28 million hectares – are monocultures or compositionally simple forests. This spells bad news for biodiversity, the study shows, in a country already experiencing severe wildlife population declines. Through fieldwork in south-central Sichuan Province, the researchers determined that restored monocultures support fewer species of birds and bees – common indicators of biodiversity – than sloped cropland, the very land targeted for restoration. Even mixed forests – those restored with two to five tree species – offer only marginal benefits for birds and harbor less bee diversity than cropland. But there is still a case for optimism, the authors emphasize. Choosing mixed forests over monocultures results in a net gain in bird diversity, with no penalty for bee diversity. Switching to mixed forests is also unlikely to pose significant economic risk to rural households, highlighting the potential for biodiversity gains that the Grain-for-Green program has yet to realize. READ MORE
 
Will Sundarbans lose its world heritage status?
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BANGLADESH – The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) in 1997 declared the Sundarbans to be a world heritage site. This unique and unusual forest, replete with its rare biodiversity, has been a matter of great pride to Bangladesh. But now almost 20 years hence, UNESCO may rescind the Sundarban status due to the Rampal coal-fired power plant project. The government has chosen to reject all concerns about the dire environmental harm that the Rampal coal-fired power plant will bring about. This inflexible stand of the government may cost the Sundarbans its world heritage status. Experts, environmentalists and researchers have offered hard facts and figures to highlight the damage the project will do to the forest, but the government has swept aside all reasons as unfounded, untrue and anti-development. In March this year, UNESCO sent a three-member team to visit the Rampal project site and the Sundarbans. In June it submitted its report to the government, pointing out the specific harm that the project will cause in the forest, and recommended that it be shelved or relocated. READ MORE
 
In Myanmar’s Irrawaddy Delta, a rapidly disintegrating mangrove forest
1-29-2014_Mangrove_eastern2014
MYANMAR -In a country with forests under increasing threat, Myanmar’s southern Irrawaddy Delta is home to one last precious pocket of green: Mein-ma-hla Kyun Wildlife Sanctuary. Although the Irrawaddy Delta plays host to the country’s largest remaining area of mangrove forest – 46 percent – here, too, the unique trees are rapidly disappearing and the impact has been devastating. Over the past three decades, about 83 percent of mangroves in the area have been lost, according to Win Maung of Myanmar Environmental Rehabilitation Network. Other estimates are slightly more conservative, at 75 percent. Myanmar is a known “hot spot” in Southeast Asia for mangrove loss from aquaculture, agriculture, and logging. As one of Myanmar’s most densely populated areas with an estimated population of 7.7 million, much of Irrawaddy Delta’s tree loss is caused by human beings. What is left of mangrove forests across the delta’s expanse of 13,500 square miles wasn’t enough to play the natural role of buffer when the deadly 2008 Cyclone Nargis hit. The sturdy trees have hardy, massive roots that grow in thick mud and partially above ground and are extremely resistant to high winds and flood waters. Had the Irrawaddy Delta mangrove forest been intact in 2008, experts believe that thousands of lives could have been saved. Instead, Nargis killed more than 138,000 people. Today, one small solid tract of mangroves remains nestled in a wildlife sanctuary. READ MORE

No mangroves, no land, no work
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VIETNAM – For many years now, landslides have become a common phenomenon in Kien Giang Province’s Hon Dat District, with Tho Son, Lình Huynh, and Binh Giang communes among the worst hit. The most gravely affected area is the strip of coastal land stretching from Hon Queo Hamlet in Tho Son Commune to Binh Hoa Hamlet, Binh Giang Commune. Mangrove forests have completely disappeared in some sections here. Without the protection of mangroves, waves and tides are hitting the sea dyke harder, hastening erosion and increasing the risk of breaches. Tran Trong Than, a resident of Hon Me Hamlet, said he’d been allotted a coastal mangrove forest area of six hectares 13 years ago. Erosion has reduced this to a little over 1.5 hectares at the moment. Similarly, Nguyen Van Thu of Binh Hoa Hamlet said that in the past two years alone, the coastal protection forest assigned to his family has lost some 30 metres to the sea. READ MORE
 
Gel-injected shrimp a growing problem in China
CHINA - Consumer reports of gel-filled shrimp are rising in China, according to a Chinese newspaper report. The process of injecting gel into shrimp is an illegal method of increasing their weight so they can be sold for a premium. Reports of gel-filled shrimp have been common in China for more than a decade, but are on the rise, the Beijing News reported (via the Epoch Times). Penaeus and tiger prawns, which are mostly imported from Southeast Asia, are the shrimp most frequently reported to be tainted with gel due to their large size, the article reported. Shrimp sellers found by the Beijing News reporter to be selling gel-injected shrimp blamed wholesalers for the problem. The article reported the gel is typically made from a mix of collagen, animal skin and bones, but that there is a danger more harmful – and cheaper – materials are being used. “Even if what was injected was edible gel, which may not itself be harmful, who can guarantee that the process is aseptic? ”said Liu Huiping, a member of the executive council of the Tianjin aquatic products association, told the Beijing News. READ MORE
 
AMERICA
 
A Teetering Bimini: Thinking about The Old Man and the Sea
BIMINI – From Earnest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea to his less-well-known Islands in the Stream, Bimini stars as an island full of adventure, liquor and raucous living, a man’s island, where fishing and drinking go hand-in- hand. Bimini has changed little since these books were written.  Cultural integrity is essential for such a world-class tiny island.  It is still a place of booze and boating. Bimini boasts one of the most quietly dynamic tourist industries in the country as it has always managed to maintain its personality and distinct cultural flair.  It had more barrooms than most places but also had a serious culture of lawlessness that legends like Hemingway enjoyed.  The best Bahamian equivalent to this infamy would be Joseph Spence’s  “Bimini Gal,” containing the lyrics ‘Never get a licking till I go down to Bimini’. However, we risk erasing this character by packaging everything into one de facto gated resort.  Development is essential on every island, but we lose ourselves when development is an absolute and leaves little—if anything—of the history of place and the identity of space intact. READ MORE
 
Laying foundations for the future of fishing
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USA - Cast your mind forward – 10, 15, 50 years. What do you see? The world around us is changing: resource needs are transforming alongside a booming global population. Technology is evolving exponentially, informing how we respond to daily life. Our planet’s climate and the delicate balance of our oceans are under threat. With over 3 billion people in this changing world relying on oceans for sustenance, where do fish, and fishing, fit into this future? The world’s oceans have never been higher up the political agenda. Three major international events on ocean governance took place in the last month: the second UN Preparatory Committee on a legally binding instrument for the high seas; the IUCN global congress; and the star-spangled Our Ocean Conference, addressed by President Obama, COP21 President Ségolène Royal, and Leonardo DiCaprio (to name a few). READ MORE


LAST WORD

Hello everyone,
 
My name is Isabel Robinson and I am the new volunteer here at the MAP Asia Office. I’m from Ecuador, however, I’ve been travelling around Australia and Asia for almost two years, actually after I finish here in Trang it will be two years since I left home! (I did visit for a couple of months this summer).
 
I studied Communications and Photography and next year I will be applying for the Masters in Environment (pathway in Education and Social Change) at Melbourne University. I’ll be here until January so please feel free to contact me if you need anything!
 
I’m very excited to be part of this team and very keen to learn more about conservation and mangroves, I love learning new things so if you come across with anything you think it will help me do a better job, please do send it!
 
I will always try to contribute with new and interesting information and ideas.
 
Looking forward to working with you!
 
 
Kind Regards,
 
Isabel Robinson
MAP-Asia Office Development & Field Project Assistants (Interns)
******************************************
Mangrove Action Project (MAP)
MAP - Asia Office
1/31 B-206 Chang Residence Building (Formerly Yaotak)
Vienkapang Road
Amphur Muang, Trang 92000
T H A I L A N D
 

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MAP Calendar 2017
MAP is happy to announce that we are now accepting orders for our 2017 Children's Mangrove Art Calendar . This is our 16th annual edition of Children's Mangrove Art, and this Calendar is celebrating MAP's 25th Anniversary! Please order your calendars now, and help us celebrate a quarter century of MAP's work to Save the Mangroves!"

The world's largest mangrove forest is in danger from a massive coal plant.
UNESCO can put pressure on India and Bangladesh to protect the forest, but they need to see that people around the world are speaking out. Click here to add your voice.


Our new short documentary, Reducing the Risk of Disaster through Nature-Based Solutions : Mangroves
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Tell Red Lobster its "Endless shrimp" deal is damaging and unfair to the workers SIGN THE PETITION
 
Mangroves: Guidebook to Malaysia – available for download here
 
Mangrove rehabilitation in Asia – Local Action and cross-border Transfer of Knowledge for the Conservation of Climate, Forests and Biodiversity VIEW VIDEOS HERE

Volunteer Opportunities with Mangrove Action Project CLICK HERE
 
STOP PLANTING MANGROVES ON SEAGRASS BEDS _ A CALL TO ACTION
Want to learn more about mangroves?mangrove-action-project-presentation-1-1024.jpg?cb=1424228039
Our short presentation will give you a better understanding of the issues we are working to solve. WATCH PRESENTATION
What is CBEMR? Easy to follow fact sheet – CLICK HERE

SHARE MAP'S VISION 
CLICK HERE to watch short introductory video. Together we can work "at the roots of the sea".
Join us in saving our beautiful country!
We hope you have been following the ongoing battle in Bimini, Bahamas.
We are in need of your help more than ever Click here
 
Exclusive Interview with Alfredo Quarto, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Mangrove Action Project - See more
Save the Sundarbans from Rampal power plant – View Sample Letter to Minister
Sign the Petition
 
Question Your Shrimp- Don't Buy or Sell Imported Tropical Shrimp! Sign the Petition

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum in Bangladesh - WATCH VIDEO
MARVELLOUS MANGROVES IN BRAZIL
En Portuges

MAP%20Curriculum%20Video
Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide.


FOR MORE ON MAPs AWARD WINNING CHINA MANGROVE CURRICULUM VISIT
Education in the Mangroves - China
VIMEO SHOW
VISIT OUR "MM" WEBPAGE

Check out our presentation for more details on Marvellous Mangroves

“Education In The Mangroves" can now be seen on the  PhotoPhilanthropy website here!

Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT
 
Article in Canada's Green Teacher Magazine - Read More

FREE MAP Mangrove e-cards CLICK HERE
Mangrove-Green-Turtle-Bimini-277x186
MAP’s e-Cards offer you a unique way to spread the word about MAP’s good works, while sharing beautiful photographs of the mangroves

Donate to MAP via Paypal
Giving could never be easier
Donate.jpg
It’s the action, not the fruit of the action, that's important. You have to do the right thing. It may not be in your power, may not be in your time, that there'll be any fruit. But that doesn't mean you stop doing the right thing. You may never know what results come from your action. But if you do nothing, there will be no result. —Mahatma Gandhi

Green Planet Fundraising Assists MAP – LEARN MORE

MANGROVE ISSUES 
View MAP’s uploaded Videos at MAPmangrover’sChannel

The importance of restoring mangroves in an effective, long-term manner. Mangrove CBEMR video - VIEW
Question Your Shrimp Consumer/Markets Campaign!  WATCH VIDEO

Mangrove Restoration in Asia – Watch Short Video

Mosaic of Life 
READ A MOSAIC OF LIFE Peek into the underwater world of mangroves, "womb of the sea." By Liz Cunningham Photos By Wes Matweyew and Liz Cunningham
 

"Question Your Shrimp" Campaign

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog
Editor’s Note: Mangrove Action Project’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto was interviewed about shrimp by Green Acre Radio’s Martha Baskin
LISTEN TO INTERVIEW

Information sheds clear light on shrimp-mangrove connection
Question Your Shrimp
SEE DETAILS MANGROVE/SHRIMP

Join MAP on Facebook

Sign the Consumer's Pledge to avoid imported shrimp

Donate.jpg

Not yet a MAP News subscriber?
Click here to subscribe.
Mangrove Action Project

Note to Our Readers:
We strive to keep active links in our newsletter. However, due to circumstances beyond our control,
occasionally links to stories may become broken. If you find a link to a story is not functioning, please cut and paste the headline into your browser search bar. In most cases you should be able to locate the original story.



Help Mangrove Action Project through your recycled E-Waste.  List of Accepted E-waste Items:
Injet Cartidges, Cell Phones, Pagers, GPS, Radar Detectors, Mobile Hot Spots, Calculators, eBook Readers, iPods/MP3 players, Digital/Video Cameras/Camcorders, PDAs, iPads/Tablets/Laptops, Video Game Consoles, Handheld Video Games
Visit the Mangrove Action Project recycle website Click on the recycle button then click on the Download Shipping Label, and follow the instructions.

 
download_shipping_label




 
Mangrove Action Project
Click here to view past newsletters
MAPNEWS_website